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Sun September 1

Observe The Sun Safely – Never look at the Sun without a proper filter!
 Solar Programs are held 1st Sunday of every Month 2:00-4:00 PM at Houge Park  weather permitting.

I expected a less than average turnout this Labor Day weekend. Yet we had 4 Solar Scope Setups and a nice crowd of folks (thanks to all for coming out) that kept the event going past 4:00 o’clock.

Click Image to Enlarge
Sun2013-09-01USE
Four Scope Setups were rewarded with a very active view of the Sun. Thanks to Gary Chock for photo.
Septsol

Jenny at 100mm H-Alpha scope checking out the “Bic lighter” prominence.

And speaking of that O’clock we noted superb H-Alpha flares (quiescent prominences) at 7, 9 and  12, refactor view, and one “Bic lighter” H-Alpha active flare (surge prominence) at 8 o’clock on the solar dial. The quiescent flares extended some 40,000 miles from the Sun and extended along the Sun 70-80 thousand miles.  The narrow surge prominence extended some 80,0000 miles form the surface before we saw it’s upper region dissipate.
Prominence classes – the word flare is a nebulous term. Some prominences are flares in heliophysics sense and generally they all are. Educating kids, I use the word H-Alpha flare instead of the abstract term prominence. This helps young viewers understand what they are looking for while identifying it in the H-Alpha or Chromosphere layer of Sun.

Prominence classes – the word flare is a nebulous term. Some prominences are flares in heliophysics sense and generally they all are. Educating kids, I use the word H-Alpha flare instead of the abstract term prominence. This helps young viewers understand what they are looking for while identifying it in the H-Alpha or Chromosphere layer of Sun.

At it’s peak the solar dynamo is sizzling and dazzling. In Keven Lahey’s 10 inch scope we counted 28 sunspots in 4 groups giving a sunspot count of 68. Actually I incorrectly counted four groups instead of three. Had I not done that my estimate would have agreed with the ISN, International Sunpot Number of 58. Below is an image of the Sun for September 1st.

sun.
Three Sunspot Groups and a total Number of 28 sunspots gives Sunspot Number (SN = G+N) of 58.

Look forward to seeing everyone next Solar Meetup at Houge October 6th!

Posted in Blog, Solar


Solar Eclipse at Green Island in Australia on Nov. 14, 2012

Author: Frank Geefay

My wife and I went on a tour of Australia in November 2012 with MWT Associates, Inc. (Melita Wade Thorpe) Melitatrips Travel specializing and Astronomical tours.  This is our 4th tour with them and actually the least enjoyable because it was one of the largest tours they had ever put on and coordination had something to be desired.  Until this trip we had nothing but praise for their service.  I guess the lesson is not to take large tours.

The highlight of the trip was the eclipse of the sun on November 14, 2012 on Green Island:

  • 1st Contact 5:45am
  • 2nd Contact: 6:38am Diamond Ring begins totality (Sun will be at 14 degrees)
  • 3rd Contact: 6:40am Diamond Ring closes totality
  • 4th Contact: 7:40am

We arrived at Green Island from Cairns by ferry at about 2:ooam to find a spot and set up.  It was dark but we had all brought flashlights so we could more or less find a good spot along the narrow beach.  When we arrived the tide was out and the coral beach extended out for about 75 yards.  By the time we left around 7:50am the water was literally lapping at our feet.

Stills and video shots of the Total Eclipse of the Sun were taken from Green Island Australia on November 14, 2012. Though there were clouds in the sky the majority of the eclipse was relatively unobscured by them. We later hear that those who stayed in Cairns Australia about 25 miles from Green Island had cloudy weather that obscured the view of the eclipse. There was a 50-50% chance of cloud cover for Green Island. We lucked out. The eclipse started about 5:45am, entered totality at 6:38am, and ended at 7:40am local Green Island time.

I brought with me a Nikon D5100 SLR using a 55-300mm lens with a sun filter and a Panasonic V500 camcorder and two cheap and light weight tripods.  I really didn’t have any experience taking eclipse photos at the time.   The earlier half of the eclipse photos were taken in auto mode where the shutter speed was about 1/30 sec. so images were slightly blurred due to shaking while pressing the shutter button.   The later darker images were taken in manual mode with 1/1000 shutter speed and are much sharper.  I took about one photo every 5 min. and at totality switched to my camcorder.  The tripod movement was jerky so it was difficult to keep it steady while taking photos and videos.

I was so busy taking photos that I really didn’t get a chance to enjoy the eclipse as did my wife.  I didn’t really see how dark it got at totality though my feeling is that it was like being under a shade.  It didn’t get really dark like in some eclipse where the moon is closer to the earth.  The YouTube below is the results of all my efforts as a beginner.  You can see some of the clouds that passed by.  There was a short period that the sun was almost half obscured by clouds.

Posted in Blog, Solar, Trip Reports
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August 4th Solar Sunday 2013

Observe The Sun Safely – Never look at the Sun without a proper filter!  Solar Programs are held 1st Sunday of every Month 2:00-4:00 PM at Houge Park   weather permitting

Counting The Spots:

Today the International Sunspot Number (SN) was 76 based on 24 stations whie NOAA’s, which always rings in higher, was 104.

Carl Reisinger had a beautiful duel scope setup today with one housing a Baader Herschel Wedge and green filter and the other holding Seymour front end filter. We counted the centered 4 major sunspot groups plus 17 sunspots – giving a SN of 57.

Carl
Madhusudan (Left) and Carl (Right) chatting next to his cool duel setup. It tracks the sun allowing one to up scope magnification to count sunspots and get very good views up the penumbra around sunspot centers. Nice areas of Plage (active regions) were seen today.

If we included the group at the edge (see below image) than our SN woud have been 67. If we correct this count for using a 4-inch scope and account for weather (predominately thermals) than we get a SN number nearly spot on with the International Sunspot Number. Unlike NOAA’s count, The International SN stays true to the historical data and method invented by Rudalf Wolf to log daily SN:

SN = k [10 x Total # sunspot groups + Total # of spots]

 Today’s (August 4th) Sunspots click to enlarge!
SunAugust4th

Today’s Sun in H-Alpha – click to enlarge!
august-4th-solar-sunday-2013

Gabre Gessesse hung out with us today and as usual, we had a nice crowd of folks and families who stopped by:
FamilySolar

Stellar Cheers!

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Solar GSSP Tidings

Behemoth sunspot AR1785 is undergoing a metamorphasis, changing shape by the hour as it turns toward Earth. This movie from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory shows the action on July 6-7:

And Here’s a Pic from Michael Packer 80mm Refractor + Standard Solar filter using a hand held LX5 at the Eyepiece.

52-Sun-July7
And here is an H-alpha shot from Robert Duvall from Houge Park – Home of SJAA:

Click to enlarge!
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This pic was taken near Adin CA and in other words:

The Golden Gate Star Party 2013 Has Started!
50-GSSPFence

1 comment:

Bilal YounasJuly 10, 2013 at 3:18 AM

really great and informative post movie which you describe it very very important Nasa always Great .
San jose Limo Services

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El Sol

El Sol on Fathers Day

P1030382BVCDE

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Solar Row + Cal K

Solar Scope Row and Calcium K!
Observe The Sun Safely – Never look at the Sun without a proper filter! 
 Solar Programs are held 1st Sunday of every Month 2:00-4:00 PM at Houge Park   weather permitting

Lots of Solar Scopes lined up today at Houge Park and with superb variety! We were treated to live screen captures of the sun in Calcium K band by Carl Reisinger. And Robert Duvall (baseball cap below pic) brought his Standard Filtered Dob stacked with an H-Alpha finder (yuk yuk). High resolution shots of the above are below so read on.

Click Photo to Enlarge
1-T-Row

Next to Robert in the above pic is a bloke visiting from Malaysia. He spent the whole afternoon looking through this row of high tech equipment and was gobsmacked. In his home country, he has two telescopes and is well known for his efforts to share the wonders of the sky.

Two fine solar scopes: Coronado PST and JMI Binocular.
2-NO-Chis+and+F
Below is today’s sun at a glance courtesy of Robert Duvall. 2 Large Sunspot groups and two smaller active regions resulted in a sunspot count of 60. The Largest group had a fantastic Penumbra network surrounding the inner umbra. Paul’s 8 inch SCT which he set up later showed this network beautifully as did Michael Swartz’s 100mm Stellarvue with green continuum filter and Binocular. And here is Robert’s images through his equipment. Make sure you see the large rendition by clicking on image.
Click Photo to Enlarge
3-C-AlphYES
And below is a pic of Carl Reisinger and Calcium K Setup. The image to the left is a totally raw image. Note the extensive and hot plage (white) network that this filter easily picks up. This plage is actually a better indicator of how active the sun is and can point to areas where sunspots may form. Click the Pic!
  Click Photo to Enlarge
4-CalK2
Below pic of Michael Swartz at his cool duel refactor setup. Both refractors have binoviewers making this setup one of the best observing stations on the row. The binoculars radically improve the noted resolution (as you are using both eyes). The continuum filtered view compares well with Paul’s filtered 8-inch SCT while Michael’s bino H-Alpha yields 3D like views. Both images seen through this duel setup are crazy beautiful.
5-NO-MiChael
Below is a pic of Bill O’Niel looking through Michael’s setup. Bill brought his 5-inch SCT which is a very portable scope that gives very satisfying details of larger spots like we had today. Aperture rules when viewing sunspots and so, unless you have a bino’ed refactor, you will want at least a 5-inch scope to see penumbra network detail.
6-No-Bill

Stellar Cheers and Mag -26.74 skies, Michael Packer

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Second Peak!

Today’s Sun Spot Count 212 (NOAA

Today’s Sunspot Number beats the peak average at the last cycle. And it is a must check out! Even in an 80mm with standard solar filter. Note that the last Solar Max was a double peak and our current Max is also a double peak. See graph below. Also lots of CME’s right now see last report at bottom of this blog.

Click Image To Enlarge
ssn_predict_l

Solar Viewing at Houge Park on Sunday 5/5, by Michael Swartz 

I really didn’t like the way the sky looked. I was temped to not go. But as I saw the sun peak through now and then, I just couldn’t resist. So I finished up my honey-do’s and made it to the park. Michael Packer was already there, all alone. I backed in next to his car, got out, had a couple views though his set up, and figured I might as well get set up my gear too. Before I was finished we had attracted a crowd of 8-10 people.

He got into a really interesting discussion about super novas with some people while I was helping a father and son get some quick views.

The sky was pretty cloudy but as the clouds slowly moved across the sky the sun would peak through for a few minutes here and there. We mostly sat and talked. However, the views we did get now and then were really good, and even though it was fairly windy, the scopes performed pretty well. There was a large gnarley spot group, plenty of surface activity, lots of dramatic swirly flows of plasma, nice filaments, some pretty prominences.

I had hoped for better weather but I am glad I went. I think we had a good time.

These Sunday afternoon solar viewing gatherings at Houge Park are fun. I usually bring my kids who enjoy the playgrounds in the park, ride their ripsticks or play ball. Maybe next time I’ll bring some picnic stuff and stay longer.

Observe The Sun Safely – Never look at the Sun without a proper filter! 
 Solar Programs are held 1st Sunday of every Month 2:00-4:00 PM at Houge Park   weather permitting

INFO FROM SIDC – RWC BELGIUM 2013 May 17 12:57:52 Two M-class flares in past 24h, both from NOAA AR 1748. The first one occurred on May 16 at 21:53 UT, with intensity M1.3. The second flare was an M3.2 and peaked at 08:57 UT on May 17. This AR has still potential for producing X class flares. It maintains its beta-gamma-delta magnetic configuration, even though some fragmentation is seen in the trailing region and there are some indications that polarities are separating within the delta spot penumbra. The M3.2 flare of today was related to radio bursts and a CME. SWAP detected clear dimmings and an EIT wave around NOAA AR1748. There are no LACO data available yet, but a CME is indeed seen in STEREO COR2 data, it can be Earth directed. The speed in COR2-B is calculated to be 1300 km/s, making a possible arrival to the Earth on May 19 around noon. Protons levels (10MeV) are still above threshold, stable around 3 protons/cm2-s-sr.Geomagnetic conditions have been unsettled to active, due to long lasting periods of slow solar wind with sustained mild negative Bz (around -5nT). These are not related to the arrival of the CME of May 15, which is still not visible in ACE data, and may still arrive later today and produce storm levels (estimated max K = 6). As a reminder, this series of CMEs related to AR 1748 had a source region within 30 degrees of the solar limb, which reduces their possibility of arrival to the Earth to around 30%.

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Hellacious Sun

May 1st Sun

S5

The Sun kicked off May (and its surface) a hellacious sized flair. Several active regions and a very dark sunspot are aimed at a planet just found to have a core temp 1000 degrees hotter than previously measured. Here’s a solar pic taken with my LX5 @ the eyepiece:

Join SJJA for a Cinco De Mayo Solar Party This May 5th Sunday!Details at www.SJAA.net

Observe The Sun Safely – Never look at the Sun without a proper filter!

Solar Programs are held 1st Sunday of every Month 2:00-4:00 PM
at Houge Park weather permitting

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Astronomy Day at SJ MLK Public Library

Nice day for sunspots, solar flares, and Astronomy Day at the San Jose Martin Luther King Public Library. The volunteers Isaac, Teruo, Keith, Michael and Kevin made this event a success so thanks to all! But a huge thanks to the Library and staffers Deborah and Judith who helped make this stellar educational day happen! Thanks! Stargazers often say if we get one person hooked on astronomy then that makes any observing session worth it. SJAA did more than that with the 70 folks who stopped by. There were lots of “oohs” “aahs” and “wows” today and one person said he is going home and becoming a member of the San Jose Astronomy club now! Check out the Pics:

Observe The Sun Safely – Never look at the Sun without a proper filter!
Solar Programs are held 1st Sunday of every Month 2:00-4:00 PM at Houge Park weather permitting

SJAA 2013 Astronomy Day

AstroDay01
Club’s H-Alpha Scope and Teruo’s SCT

AstroDay02

Today’s Sun below:

AR1726 is the fastest-growing Sunspot and, so far, the most active. It is crackling with C-class flares

Clip

At the Booth – Teruo center, Keith Right

AstroDay03

Beautiful day to do some Solar Astro chillin’

AstroDay01

Kevin and Michael – Michael’s looking through Kevin’s 10″ Sunspot killer. Any spot on the Sun is revealed in detail.

AstroDay05

Isaac (left) brought Solar Binoculars and a H-Alph Pronto to share with folks

AstroDay07

Clear Skies !

1 comment:

thanks for share..

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Cupertino’s Earth Day

Cloudy Day At Earth Day Still Saw The Sun

From 11 to 3:30 we had about four 10-20 minute viewing sessions where we offered the public good views of a very active Sun. With Isaac and Hiedi’s H-alpha/Standard solar setups, Bill’s scope and SJAA’s we got a lot of people their first look ever at a massive sun spot plus several smaller ones and above average prominences (prototypical looper) around the solar disk. We had lines of people during these sunshine times. I probably got ~40 people views in 10 minutes ~ 15 seconds per person. During the time of clouds we talked to numerous interested folks or with interested kids the perfect age 9+/- and handed out all of our brochures. We also handed out a decent number of pamphlets on preserving our starry night sky from the International Dark-Sky Association.

Observe The Sun Safely – Never look at the Sun without a proper filter!
 Solar Programs are held 1st Sunday of every Month 2:00-4:00 PM at Houge Park   weather permitting

Isaac showing our nearest star to folks with his duel scope set-up
 Michael Showing H-Alpha Sun with the camera crew taking notice
  How the sun looked: Standard Filter and H-Alpha
Click to Enlarge!
 Cloudy bouts allowed for great astro conversations
 Young and old got great views when the sun was out
 Great shot of SJJA’s dedicated volunteer Bill O‘Neil
 Volunteers Michael Heidi Bill and Isaac – Thanks All!
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Polar Solar Weekend!

Public Solar Viewing Saturday & Sunday April 6th & 7th:

Sat 11 – 3PM: Cupertino’s Earth Day @ Cupertino Civic Center
CLICK HERE FOR EARTH DAY FLYER
Sun  2 – 4PM : SJAA’s H+Alpha Day @ Houge Park

POLAR FILAMENT ERUPTION: Not every eruption requires a sunspot. On April 1st (no fooling) a magnetic filament snaking some 800,000 km around the sun’s north pole rose up and erupted, hurling part of itself into space. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) recorded the event; 7 O’Clock on the solar dial:

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SJAA Solar Picnic

Observe The Sun Safely – Never look at the Sun without a proper filter! 
Solar Programs are held 1st Sunday of every Month 2:00-4:00 PM at Houge Park weather permitting

SJAA Solar Picnic – Fun Under the Sun!

Double Trouble: Michael Swartz’s H-Alpha and Standard Filter duel scope setup 1

  Today’s Sunspots: small but with good distribution. Solar proms: Numerous and LargeClip_4

Relaxing Solar Picnic was the note of the day! 3

Bill O’Neil (Left) Sunspots views using 18Ga aluminum and powder coated white or
 “Baader” type white solar filter  2

Michael Packer checking out H-Alpha emission 4

 Next Solar Party is Sunday March 3rd
Volunteers with scopes and SJAA members get free hydration (water and soft drinks)

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Solar Sunday Report Feb 10th

Solar Sunday Report February 10th,  2013

Observe The Sun Safely – Never look at the Sun without a proper filter!
Solar Programs are held 1st Sunday of every Month 2:00-4:00 PM at Houge Park   weather permitting

A beautiful California day provided a good crowd and fun viewing of the solar disk. Malika’s projector showed the major sunspots. And Michael Swartz’s dual refractor set up (Neutral density and H-alpha – both with binoculars simultaneously displayed the sunspot and prominences in great detail.

Photo courtesy of Jag Sonti
keep1

With the Rotation of a new spot into field of view the Sunspot Count Jumped to the 40’s and solar viewers got to see the Wilson Effect – See below images.

Click Image For Larger View!
SunFeb11b

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We have another Solar Observing Day this month on Feb 24th and as usual 1st Sunday March 3.  Come on out. (Folks with solar setups and scopes are provided with water.)

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Solar Peak

The Sun’s Hot Right Now!

Observe The Sun Safely – Never look at the Sun without a proper filter!

Sun Spot Number Graph
Last Updated 25 Jan 2013 13:03 UT

Graph of Sunspot Numbers
Plus Two Great Shot of Sun From SJAA Member Robert Devall

Click These Photos To Enlarge ! !
RDuvallJan20-2013

Observer Regularly And Enjoy

Posted in Articles, Blog, Solar


El Sol de Milo 01-13-13

ObserveThe Sun Safely – Never look at the Sun without a proper filter!
Solar Programs are held 1st Sunday of every Month 2:00-4:00 PM at Houge Park  weather permitting

El Sol de Milo

sun0

El Sol is “stellar” right now. The sunspot group at center is 1x with solar glasses (so get your money’s worth and check it out). The discerning eye will note it does not look like a point but spread out diminishing to upper left (from a non-telescope CA  perspective}.

Here’s a earlier capture of the Sunspot using a highly affordable eyepiece projection system.  Credit: Malika Carter
Malika+(2)In h-alpha or standard filter the group is wicked with notable plage, pillage and turmoil.

Flares are kicker – the 6 O’clock is a looper – angled toward earth – so drapes onto the solar sphere from our perspective… 2 large prototypical loops are at 4 oclock and further up. Flares are all around the sun with most extending 6 white dwarf diameters (ie earth diameters) from the photosphere – the “surface” of the sun.

Taking an off axis shot with your point and shoot can giveyou better sunspot contrast & detail:
SUN1

Stellar views!

Posted in Blog, Solar


Solar Activity and Winter Observing

We could be going through Solar max now: 
Latest graph: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/SolarCycle/
The latest graph of sunspot count:

Latest Sunspot number prediction

SUBSIDING STORM: Last night, Nov. 13/14, Northern Lights spilled across the Canadian border into the United States during a moderately strong (Kp=6) geomagnetic storm. Spotters report naked-eye auroras just barely over Colorado. Cal is always possible so keep looking up and North. Active Astro sites prove to be the best for catching aurora posts but this NOAA page gives you a Kp map – Click on North America: http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/Aurora/#kpmaps

 

Click to images to enlarge!

This Email alert can hedge you bets for solar flares and aurorae – I use it for h-alpha:
Real Time e-mail Solar Flare Alert: http://www.ips.gov.au/mailman/listinfo/ips-flare-alert  (see also http://www2.gi.alaska.edu/AuroraAlerts/ )

Posted in Blog, Solar


Solar Observing Nov 4th

Observe The Sun SafelyNever look at the Sun without a proper filter!
Solar Programs are held 1st Sunday of every Month 2:00-4:00 PM at Houge Park  weather permitting

Take The Sunspot Quiz:

http://solar-center.stanford.edu/quizzes/sunspot_quiz_flash.html

Solar Observing November 4th was sublime. Nice because the weather was perfect cooltemperature, clear skies and fair seeing. The Sunspot count was in the 40’s with 4 sunspot pairs – two above the solar equator – two “mirror images” below. That was too neat to see 🙂

The symmetry of the Sun’s magnetic field lines means that a sunspot pair which forms above the equator can equally likely form a mirror image below the equator – a negative ( -x , -y )  mirror image.

Sunspot generally form in pairs.
A sunspot pair can again be formed as a mirror image below the sun’s equator because of the symmetry of the sun’s magnetic field.

H-Alpha Prominences were large and notable all around the solar disk: hedge shape, spicule and branching tree shapes noted.

Folks we are a just a standard deviation from the solar cycle maximum. 

Posted in Blog, Solar


October Sun 1x Visible Sunspots

OCTOBER 1st
Visible Sunspots over next couple of days!

Observe The Sun SafelyNever look at the Sun without a proper filter!
Solar Programs are held 1st Sunday of every Month 2:00-4:00 PM at Houge Park  weather permitting

Sunspot or active region AR 1582 is a 1x spot. And so is AR 1579 which is just barely visible. Is it to the right or left? 🙂

Over next couple of days one will still need good eyes and a good solar filter to see these (and welding glass wont cut it). Solar glasses are good, Solar Cards better.

Malika Carter: Sunspot image with her eyepiece projection system. Click photo to enlarge.
AR1579+1582

For those of you who have H-alpha scopes: Good prominences at limb particularly at ~5 O’clock refactor view – prominence drapes over the photosphere creating a sinuous filament.

Clear Magnitude -26.73 skies Michael Packer

Posted in Anouncements, Blog, Solar


It Was Bound To Happen + Sunspots and The Spinning Sun

Observe The Sun SafelyNever look at the Sun without a proper filter! 
Solar Programs are held 1st Sunday of every Month 2:00-4:00 PM at Houge Park   weather permitting

The Sun and Saturn – It Was Bound To Happen:

Over the 4th of July I got together with old friends and instead of shooting off fireworks – which btw would get you shot in the Klamath woods of the Siskiyou mountains – I offered viewing the distant fireworks of the Sun in H-Alpha. These friends for the most part were oblivious to the hobby of astronomy – some had never seen Saturn in a scope – which was on the agenda for the night.

On the 4th sunspot activity was good with “1x” visible sunspot group – a smear of spots in between two large spots making a of a very good “face on the Sun”. It looked like the face of a fox to some. (I’d really love to hear the conspiracy theories for this fiery crop circle). Anyway plasma was streaming off the solar limb south of this group in spectacular geometries and other prominences could be seen all around the solar disk. All-in-all it was an average H-alpha day for 2012. But to these folks who had never seen the Sun in H-Alpha it was a mind blowing wicked-sick day.  A couple could not take their eyes off the show and needed to know everything.

pNight came and it was Saturn’s turn. Its rings and moon Titan shinning brightly. Seeing was pretty fair and the best view of the planet through a TV85 was @ 150x using a 4mm Radian. Very decent power for CA.. I don’t have to explain to veterans of this hobby the impression Saturn makes to first timers. However the words did flow – “Wow, OMG, Surreal, get-the-heck-out-of-here and holly <insert expletive>.”

But then I heard it. And the comment was entirely reasonable for a 1st timer to say: “Cool but not quite as cool as the Sun.” It was bound to happen. Personally I have never heard anyone compare Saturn to another planet or DSO with any vigor: Mars, NGC4565, nope. Saturn is in a class all by itself. And to be fair, if the view of Saturn was through a Bill Burton’s 12.5″ with a binoviewer at the Florida WSP (think festoons, Encke, 500x) – well the comparison would never leave a person’s lips…

I don’t think.

The H-Alpha Sun – “it’d be happen, maad and irie mon

The Spin of the Sun – Sunspots appearing and disappearing off face:

On July 6th SJAA member Malika took two excellent shots of sunspot spinning in to and out view. Below are the cools images – which I rotated and doctored a bit to bring detail.

Click one image. When it pops up you can click on thumbnails below it to advance (go back an forth) between the two and see the sunspot appear/disappear at the top and bottom limb. Nice!!!

On_resize Off_resize
Posted in Blog, Solar


Solar Observing August 5th

Observe The Sun SafelyNever look at the Sun without a proper filter!
Solar Programs are held 1st Sunday of every Month 2:00-4:00 PM at Houge Park weather permitting

The are a so many objects up in the night sky for amateur astronomers to enjoy, travel to with his/her scope and learn something new. Yet it is the same way with out single star up in the day sky, The solar cycle generates new sunspots and flares of beauty, size and ominous power. Today many of us saw hands-down “thee” longest filament, prominence, h-alpha flare, projected on the solar disk we have ever seen. Winding over the disk of the sun it easily spanned 1/3 of the entire solar face. if the filament was stretched out, it would easily span 1/2 the solar disk or some 50 Earth diameters!

While all of us at Houge were viewing this and thinking about Curiosity’s Landing expected in the evening, SJAA member Malika was actually at JPL enjoying the event and showing sunspots to public. Her Sunspotter eyepiece projection system beautifully captured all 6 major sunspots:

Click on a image to enlarge. Then compare the two by clicking icons at bottom of view screen

MalSunAug1st SunAug5th
Right On!
Posted in Articles, Blog, Education & Reference Info, Solar